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Cloudstreet [Audio]
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The modern Australian classic.

About the Author

Tim Winton has published 20 books for adults and children, and his work has been translated into 25 languages. Since his first novel, An Open Swimmer, won the Australian/Vogel Award in 1981, he has won the Miles Franklin Award four times and twice been shortlisted for the Booker Prize. A passionate environmentalist, he currently lives on the Western Australian coast with his wife and three children. Peter Hosking is an actor with 40 years of stage, film and television experience and has narrated over 160 audiobooks. He toured Australia with the stage show Certified Male, appeared on television in Blue Heelers and on screen in Pride, Siam Sunset, The Wogboy and Razor Eaters. Now living in Europe, he has toured with stage shows within Australia, New Zealand, Europe, the USA and Egypt as well as filming in the Czech Republic, Denmark, the Canary Islands and Poland. He continues to record for Bolinda from his base in Prague.

Reviews

Australian Winton's fifth novel is chock-full, depicting birth, death, resurrection, marriage, miscarriage, gambling, drunkenness, adultery, anorexia, depression, love, and joy. From 1944 to 1964, the Pickles and Lamb families share a large house in a suburb of Perth on the wrong side of the tracks. The Pickles own the house and are slothful, he a gambler with long streaks of bad luck, she often drunk and adulterous. The tenant Lambs are hard-working. After the latter open a successful grocery on the first floor of the house, the families' lives become intertwined, and home and hearth become an anchor. World War II, Australian politics, the Cuban missle crisis, and Kennedy's assassination take a backseat to their trials and final joy. Biblical imagery, a talking pig, a house that cracks its knuckles, a son who glows in the dark, and a mysterious black ``guardian angel'' add spice to a book whose language resonates and charms. Highly recommended for most fiction collections. Previewed in Prepub Alert, LJ 1/92.-- Harold Augenbraum, Mercantile Lib., New York

``Luck don't change, love,'' observes Sam Pickles to his daughter Rose. ``It moves.'' Considerations of fate and love underlie Winton's ( Shallows ) wry novel, set in Western Australia, about two families thrown together in the years following WW II. Sam Pickles earns a modest living mining guano for nitrate until he loses his hand in an accident. Fortunately, the family inherits a rambling old house--the Cloudstreet of the title--in which they can live, although they still lack cash. The dilemma is resolved with the sudden arrival of the rigid, God-fearing Lamb family, whom the rather libertine Pickles take in as boarders. Following the quirky, deeply etched members of these families--``flamin whackos,'' in Quick Lamb's description--as they forge bonds and undergo travails, Winton explores the haphazard nature of human existence with a quietly focused ferocity. Featuring lyrical passages and rapid-fire, minimally punctuated dialogue, this satiric, affectionate family saga is tragic and hilarious--and often both at once. Winton shows himself a worthy successor to his countryman Martin Boyd, who portrayed the Anglo-Australian society of previous generations. (Apr.)

"One of those rare novels that warm the heart, as well as spark the imagination." -- Kirkus Reviews
"Nothing short of magnificent ... a wonderful read." -- Time Out
"With sensitivity and vision, novelist Tim Winton creates an Australian classic that takes the listener into the world of two wholly believable working-class families in post-WWII Perth. The Pickles family inherits, but cannot afford to keep, Cloudstreet, a rambling, ramshackled house - so they take in the Lambs as their boarders. The Pickles are an irreligious, indolent lot, while the Lambs are pious and hard-working. Peter Hosking's performance is true to Winton's unsentimental exploration into humankind's ability to love and survive amid adversity. Hosking handles the mundane and the mystical with equal assurance. His characterizations, including an Aboriginal ghost and a talking pig, are earthy, real, and frequently hilarious. Hosking makes the most of Winton's honesty, wit, and original imagery." -- AudioFile Magazine

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