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Group Work
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Table of Contents

List of Practice Illustrations Preface Acknowledgments Introduction PART I. DIMENSIONS OF THE HUMANISTIC APPROACH 1. Humanistic Values and Democratic Norms: Equal Rights Historical Overview of Democratic Principles Values of the Humanistic Group Democratic Norms as Values in Action Humanistic Values 1-4 Humanistic Value 1: People Have Inherent Worth and Equal Right to Oportunity Humanistic Value 2: People Are Responsible for and to One Another Humanistic Value 3: People Have the Right to Belong to and Be Included in Supportive Systems Humanistic Value 4: People Have the Right to Take Part and to Be Heard Summary 2. Further Humanistic Values and Democratic Norms: Freedoms Humanistic Values 5-8 Humanistic Value 5: People Have the Right to Freedom of Speech and Freedom of Expression Humanistic Value 6: People Who Are Different Enrich One Another Humanistic Value 7: People Have the Right to Freedom of Choice Humanistic Value 8: People Have the Right to Question and Challenge Professionals in Authority Roles Summary 3. Stage Themes of Group Development Overview of Stage Theory The T-Group Model and the Boston Model Beginning, Middle, and Ending Phases Group Process and Group Purpose Stage Theory and Member Differences Stage Themes and Practitioner Reactions to Members Stage Themes: Humanism and Democracy Stage Themes of group development Stage Theme 1: "We're Not in Charge" Stage Theme 2: "We Are in Charge" Stage Theme 3: "We're Taking You On" Stage Theme 4: Sanctuary Stage Theme 5: "This Isn't Good Anymore" Stage Theme 6: "We're Okay and Able" Stage Theme 7: "Just a Little Longer" Summary PART II. OBJECTIVES AND TECHNIQUES OF HUMANISTIC GROUP WORK 4. Dual Objectives: Developing the Democratic Mutual Aid System and Actualizing Purpose The Dual Objectives: Developing the Democratic Mutual Aid System and Actualizing Purpose Developing the Democratic Mutual Aid System Actualizing Group Purpose Accomplishing the Dual Objectives Dual Objectives and the Change Process Interactions of the Dual Objectives Forms of Interaction that Foster the Democratic Mutual Aid System Forms of Interaction that Foster the Actualization of Group Purpose Summary 5. Techniques for Developing the Democratic Mutual Aid System Use of Technique Categorizing Techniques Techniques for Developing the Democratic Mutual aid System Facilitating Collective Participation Scanning Engaging the Group as a Whole Modulating the Expression of Feeling Facilitating Decision-Making Processes Processing the Here and Now Expressing Feelings About the Practitioner Role Goal Setting Good and Welfare Summary 6. Techniques for Actualizing Group Purpose Techniques for Actualizing Group Purpose Role Rehearsal Programming Group Reflective Consideration Interpretation Feedback Summary 7. Further Techniques for Actualizing Group Purpose Further Techniques for Actualizing Group Purpose Conflict Resolution Group Mending Confrontation Data and Facts Self-Disclosure Dealing With the Unknown Taking Stock Summary 8. Techniques for Developing the Democratic Mutual Aid System and Actualizing Group Purpose Techniques for Developing the Democratic Mutual Aid System and Actualizing Group Purpose Demand for Work Directing Lending a Vision Staying With Feelings Silence Support Exploration Identification Summary PART III. DIFFERENTIAL APPLICATION OF THE HUMANISTIC APPROACH 9. Assessing the Member in the Group Assessment Activities and the Group Member Assessing the Member in the Group Psychosocial Criteria for Assessment Capacity Toward Mutual Aid and Purpose Ego Abilities and Sense of Self Social Institutional Environment Stereotypes and Self-Fulfilling Prophesies Symbolic Representations of the Practitioner and Group Summary 10. Fields of Practice and Humanistic Group Work Mental Health Groups Health Care Groups Substance and Alcohol Addictions Groups Summary PART IV. PRACTICE VARIATIONS AND CONTINGENCIES 11. Short-Term, Single-Session, Open-Ended, and Structured Groups Short-Term Groups Single-Session Groups Open-Ended Groups Structured Groups Summary 12. Contingencies Setting Up the Group Meeting Preparing for the Initial Meeting Informal Between-Session Contacts With Practitioner Formal Between-Session Contacts With Practitioner Postgroup Responsibilities Copractice Summary References Index About the Author

About the Author

Urania Ernest Glassman, MA, MSW, DSW, LCSW Dr. Glassman's role as director of field instruction spans 30 years. Her social work specializations are field education, group work, and clinical practice. She is currently Principal Investigator of a $1.4 million grant from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services - HRSA for Wurzweiler School of Social Work Yeshiva University to train 2nd year students in clinical field placements with high risk adolescents and transitional age youth. Her recent volume with Sage, Group Work: A Humanistic and Skills Building Approach 2nd Ed., provides underpinning for the training design. Dr. Glassman maintains a long-standing clinical practice with individuals, families, and groups. She has written and presented papers on field education processes and experiential learning, training field educators, group work, and clinical practice. Dr. Glassman served on the Council on Social Work Education Commission on Educational Policy during the time when social work competencies were defined and field education as social work's signature pedagogy was branded. She was instrumental in the development of CSWE's field education symposium - now the field education track, co-founder of NANFED - North American Network of Field Educators and Directors, and of the NYC Red Apple Chapter of the International Association of Social Work with Groups, and has served as chair of these initiatives.

Reviews

"Group Work: A Humanistic and Skills Building Approach delivers as promised: a book solidly informed by humanistic values and principles: a book willing to teach clinical skills through a combination of theory and detailed case examples: a book equally of use and at ease in the classroom as in the field." -- Shantih E. Clemans
This book, with its 12 well-written, easy to read chapters, is highly recommended to those interested in studying group work. Social work students and supervisors will find this book useful because it presents many illustrations of group meetings that help readers to understand values, norms and practitioners' roles. -- Masoomeh Maarefvand * Social Work Education *

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