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Man the Hunter
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Table of Contents

PART I : INTRODUCTION PART II : ECOLOGY AND ECONOMICS PART III : SOCIAL AND TERRITORIAL ORGANIZATION PART IV : MARRIAGE AND MODELS IN AUSTRALIA PART V : DEMOGRAPHY AND POPULATION ECOLOGY PART VI : PREHISTORIC HUNTER-GATHERERS PART VII : HUNTING AND HUMAN EVOLUTION PART VIII : TH E CONCEPT OF PRIMITIVENESS

About the Author

Lee, Richard Borshay; DeVore, Irven

Reviews

-The Wenner-Gren symposium 'Man the hunter' represents a fascinating confrontation between the traditional (if diverse) theories of the structural anthropologists and a new generation of ecologically oriented field-workers. Anyone familiar with previous examples of these excellent symposia will know that after each section of prepared papers, the contributors have time to challenge each other's facts, exchange opinions and relate the topic under discussion to a wider context. This method leads to a genuine attempt to get to grips with a problem and can lead to very lively reading as well.... In short, this is a vital book on a vital subject, which is destined to be a classic in anthropology.- --Vernon Reynolds, Man -[E]ven if this work is not a primer for beginners, it will certainly become a provocative stimulus to professionals; and it is safe to predict that it will be an important source of debate and controversy in years to come, as well as a spur to future research on man's original condition, the hunting way of life.- --D. Lee Guemple, American Anthropologist -Man the Hunter is one of the few books which makes a scholarly effort to bridge the gap between physical anthropology, archaeology, biology, ecology, and cultural anthropology. It contains comprehensive coverage of the now-vanishing hunting-gathering mode of human subsistence and cultural development--from early Paleolithic times to the present, from the classics of archeological and anthropological research to the latest findings.... Man the Hunter should be read and re-read by the serious scholar.- --Margaret C. Wheeler, The Quarterly Review of Biology -All in all, this seems to have been a surprisingly good symposium. One suspects that much of the success should be measured in the stimulation of the actual -meeting of minds-.... [T]here are many segments that will be edifying for anyone at all interested in the quality of life of very primitive peoples.- --Elman Service, Science

"The Wenner-Gren symposium 'Man the hunter' represents a fascinating confrontation between the traditional (if diverse) theories of the structural anthropologists and a new generation of ecologically oriented field-workers. Anyone familiar with previous examples of these excellent symposia will know that after each section of prepared papers, the contributors have time to challenge each other's facts, exchange opinions and relate the topic under discussion to a wider context. This method leads to a genuine attempt to get to grips with a problem and can lead to very lively reading as well.... In short, this is a vital book on a vital subject, which is destined to be a classic in anthropology." --Vernon Reynolds, Man "[E]ven if this work is not a primer for beginners, it will certainly become a provocative stimulus to professionals; and it is safe to predict that it will be an important source of debate and controversy in years to come, as well as a spur to future research on man's original condition, the hunting way of life." --D. Lee Guemple, American Anthropologist "Man the Hunter is one of the few books which makes a scholarly effort to bridge the gap between physical anthropology, archaeology, biology, ecology, and cultural anthropology. It contains comprehensive coverage of the now-vanishing hunting-gathering mode of human subsistence and cultural development--from early Paleolithic times to the present, from the classics of archeological and anthropological research to the latest findings.... Man the Hunter should be read and re-read by the serious scholar." --Margaret C. Wheeler, The Quarterly Review of Biology "All in all, this seems to have been a surprisingly good symposium. One suspects that much of the success should be measured in the stimulation of the actual "meeting of minds..".. [T]here are many segments that will be edifying for anyone at all interested in the quality of life of very primitive peoples." --Elman Service, Science

"The Wenner-Gren symposium 'Man the hunter' represents a fascinating confrontation between the traditional (if diverse) theories of the structural anthropologists and a new generation of ecologically oriented field-workers. Anyone familiar with previous examples of these excellent symposia will know that after each section of prepared papers, the contributors have time to challenge each other's facts, exchange opinions and relate the topic under discussion to a wider context. This method leads to a genuine attempt to get to grips with a problem and can lead to very lively reading as well.... In short, this is a vital book on a vital subject, which is destined to be a classic in anthropology." --Vernon Reynolds, Man "[E]ven if this work is not a primer for beginners, it will certainly become a provocative stimulus to professionals; and it is safe to predict that it will be an important source of debate and controversy in years to come, as well as a spur to future research on man's original condition, the hunting way of life." --D. Lee Guemple, American Anthropologist "Man the Hunter is one of the few books which makes a scholarly effort to bridge the gap between physical anthropology, archaeology, biology, ecology, and cultural anthropology. It contains comprehensive coverage of the now-vanishing hunting-gathering mode of human subsistence and cultural development--from early Paleolithic times to the present, from the classics of archeological and anthropological research to the latest findings.... Man the Hunter should be read and re-read by the serious scholar." --Margaret C. Wheeler, The Quarterly Review of Biology "All in all, this seems to have been a surprisingly good symposium. One suspects that much of the success should be measured in the stimulation of the actual "meeting of minds..".. [T]here are many segments that will be edifying for anyone at all interested in the quality of life of very primitive peoples." --Elman Service, Science

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