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The Marching Season
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About the Author

Daniel Silva is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Unlikely Spy, The Mark of the Assassin, The Marching Season, and the Gabriel Allon series, including The Kill Artist, The English Assassin, The Confessor, A Death in Vienna, Prince of Fire, The Messenger, The Secret Servant, Moscow Rules, The Defector, The Rembrandt Affair, Portrait of a Spy, The Fallen Angel, The English Girl, The Heist, The English Spy, The Black Widow, and House of Spies. His books are published in more than thirty countries and are bestsellers around the world.

Reviews

The title of Silva's new thriller (after Mark of the Assassin and The Unlikely Spy) refers to the time of the year in Northern Ireland when the Protestants assert their right to march in celebration of a 300-year-old victory over the Catholics‘and the Catholics (naturally) object. The Irish background to this elaborately plotted but not very convincing yarn is by far the best part about it. Silva has clearly done his homework on Belfast and the tone of the contemporary Troubles, and the opening passages have an authentic ring. All too soon, however, the story becomes bogged down in one of those worldwide conspiracies to keep the world safe for arms merchants by blocking any efforts toward peace, of a kind only John le Carré, with his much more acute eye and ear for offbeat villains, can hope to bring off. There is a supposedly charismatic yet glum world-class assassin who bumps off the surgeon who has changed his face; an embittered ex-CIA man, Michael Osbourne, whose job is to save the free world; Osbourne's wife, who wishes he would leave the Agency alone, and various cynical and suave operatives on both sides. The whole tale is told in simple, declarative sentences that convey information (though not much else) with economy and authority, but ultimately become tedious. There are anomalies, too: a climactic shootout in Washington might work as a movie scene but sags on the page; and while such real-life figures as British Prime Minister Tony Blair, Sinn Fein's Gerry Adams and (in a truly ludicrous scene) even Queen Elizabeth are given walk-ons, the American public figures are all mythical. Despite Silva's skill at moving a story along, this is basically a mechanical and lackluster performance. (Mar.)

In this follow-up to The Unlikely Spy and Mark of the Assassins, Charles Osbourne's father-in-law has been appointed ambassador to Britain and now faces the same assassin who nearly blew Osbourne away in the last book. At issue is the uneasy peace in Northern Ireland.

"Almost unbearable tension...[the] prose urges you on like a silencer poking at the small of your back."--Entertainment Weekly "[A] Tom Clancy-esque thriller."--USA Today

"Ingenious."--The Washington Post "Fascinating...a novel of plots and counterplots...The relationship between Osbourne and October is rich in detail and complexity."--The Orlando Sentinel "Rousing...Movie-tense action sequences [and] a hero worth rooting for."--Kirkus Reviews "Starting with a bang and escalating from there, Silva's latest has everything you would expect from a thriller."--The Rocky Mountain News

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