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The Racial Contract
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Table of Contents

Introduction 1. Overview The Racial Contract is political, moral, and epistemological The Racial Contract is a historical actuality The Racial Contract is an exploitation contract 2. Details The Racial Contract norms (and races) space The Racial Contract norms (and races) the individual The Racial Contract underwrites the modern social contract The Racial Contract has to be enforced through violence and ideological conditioning 3. "Naturalized" Merits The Racial Contract historically tracks the actual moral/political consciousness of (most) white moral agents The Racial Contract has always been recognized by nonwhites as the real moral/political agreement to be challenged The "Racial Contract" as a theory is explanatorily superior to the raceless social contract Notes Index

About the Author

Charles W. Mills is Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at the University of Illinois, Chicago. He is the author of Blackness Visible: Essays on Philosophy and Race, also from Cornell, and From Class to Race: Essays in White Marxism and Black Radicalism.

Reviews

"Mills uses the idea of the social contract to argue that racially structured discrimination is a norm, rather than a deviation from the ideal... Framed by a lucid discussion of the modern global exploitation of nonwhites is Mills's appeal to standpoint epistemology to maintain that the racial contract is a naturalized version of social contract theory."-Choice "An ambitious book... Mill's racial contract thesis is so convincing that one wonders why it hasn't been explored until now in the precincts of mainstream political philosophy. But that's his point. The racial contract's effectiveness lies in its very invisibility."-In These Times "This compelling and even explosive book argues that white racism is itself a political system with its own levels of rights, duties, benefits, burdens, etc... Sure to provoke a heated debate far beyond the field of political philosophy, this bold and wide-ranging study makes a clear and convincing case for the view that systematic racial oppression was not an anomaly sullying otherwise universalistic assumptions about individual rights, but the context in which theorizing about such rights occurred."-The Front Table "An important work of philosophy that is at the same time short and accessible... Mills succeeds admirably in arguing his case for the existence of a racial contract. That he can do this in a way that is rigorous, passionate, and accessible is an important achievement."-Philosophy in Review "The Racial Contract is an excellent book... It is a testament to Mills's expertise as a philosopher, a scholar, and a downright intelligent writer that he has managed to pull off so comprehensive, informative, and persuasive a work in an elegant 133 pages (excluding notes)... He achieves this explanation through some of the clearest prose I have encountered in recent philosophical literature."-Lewis Gordon, Small Axe: A Journal of Criticism "A very important book... The Racial Contract has the potential to radically challenge many of us to reevaluate how we think about social contract theory. As well, to take the arguments that Mills makes is to be prepared to rethink about the concept of race and the structure of our political systems. This is a very important book indeed, and should be a welcome addition to the ongoing discussions surrounding social contract theory."-Teaching Philosophy "This is a significant and compelling work... Mills turns our attention to the racial domination and exploitation that have been equally pervasive features of the history of liberalism... A major contribution."-Ethics "Offers a bold conceptualization of the racial order and a critique of the way it has been (mis)represented within the domain of scholarship... Mills cuts through the shibboleths and the mystifications that pervade both popular and academic discourse on race... The Racial Contract offers a theoretical framework that ought to serve as the starting point for any serious study of race in American society... At a time when 'the epistemology of ignorance' is ascendant, we can be grateful for a book that speaks the unpalatable truth."-American Journal of Sociology "Courageously creative"-Social Theory and Practice "I recommend this book as an important and timely reminder of the ways in which a philosophy which ignores race is bound up with the privileging of whiteness. This is a lesson that is still to be learnt, even within the context of feminist philosophy."-Women's Philosophy Review "Mills's work on the Racial Contract is a major contribution to modern critical social and political thought, and will become an important, widely discussed work. It exposes, to devastating effect, the unacknowledged racial presuppositions of the entire social contract tradition, which is to say, all of liberal political theory for the past four centuries."-Robert Paul Wolff, University of Massachusetts, Amherst "Fish don't see water, men don't see patriarchy, and white philosophers don't see white supremacy. We can do little about fish. Carole Pateman and others have made the sexual contract visible for those who care to look. Now Charles Mills has made it equally clear how whites dominate people of color, even (or especially) when they have no such intention. He asks whites not to feel guilty, but rather to do something much more difficult-understand and take responsibility for a structure which they did not create but still benefit from."-Jennifer Hochschild, Princeton University "Like Melville's Benito Cereno, this short, explosive book unflinchingly explores the centrality of race-both in its utterly open brutality and in its remarkable ability to remain hidden-to the history of the Western nation-state. Sure to provoke a heated debate far beyond the field of political philosophy, this bold and wide-ranging study makes a clear and convincing case for the view that systemic racial oppression was not an anomaly sullying otherwise universalistic assumptions about individual rights, but the context in which theorizing about such rights occurred."-David Roediger, University of Minnesota "This is a significant and compelling work. In the modest compass of an extended essay, Mills succeeds in altering our view of a central strand of modern political thought, the social contract tradition. Inspired by the historical success of socialist critics in placing class and socioeconomic inequality on the political-theoretical agenda and by the ongoing success of feminist critics in doing the same for gender and patriarchy, Mills turns our attention to the racial domination and exploitation that have been equally pervasive features of the history of liberalism."-Thomas McCarthy, Northwestern University

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